Fewer vs Less: What’s The Difference?

Fewer vs Less

Fewer vs Less: What’s the Difference?

The words fewer and less are two commonly misused words. Even though they don’t look or sound the same, many people use them incorrectly. Don’t get confused! In this blog post: Fewer vs Less: What’s the Difference, I’ll give you a few tips to help you understand the difference.

Fewer:

The word fewer is defined as: a smaller number of persons or things. One example would be:

There are fewer students in the halls today.

Or:

The recipe made fewer cookies today than it did last time.

Hint: Use fewer when you discuss things you can count.

rocks, scissors, flowers, dogs, chairs, houses, cows, cars, people, proofreaders

Less:

The word less is defined as: of reduced size, extent, or degree; more limited in quantity. One example would be:

We have less time today than we did yesterday.

Or:

Why does that house cost so much less money than the other one?

Hint: Use less when you discuss things you cannot count.

time, water, honey, flour, love, carpet, air, snow, shopping, dirt, grass, syrup, ink

Pop Quiz

Ok, let’s try a few and see if you can figure out the correct word to use.

  1.  I’m going to the “15 items or  __________” checkout lane.
  2. There’s so much __________ time to play these days.
  3. There are __________ cats than dogs.
  4. He earns __________ money than she does.
  5. Next time put __________ honey on your toast.
  6. My town has  __________ citizens than your town does.
  7. Our mountains received __________ snow this year than last year.
  8. My garden has __________ weeds now, because I weeded all morning.
  9. She earned __________ medals than he did.
  10. There’s __________ time to relax in the summer; we need to schedule __________ activities and spend __________  money on time wasters.

How’d you do? Check your answers:

  1. fewer
  2. less
  3. fewer
  4. less
  5. less
  6. fewer
  7. less
  8. fewer
  9. fewer
  10. less, fewer, less

Whew! You made it! Congratulations! You are now an expert of fewer and less!

Do you need something to help you remember? Click HERE for your free download of the above graphic.

Do you need a proofreader? Click HERE for more information on my proofreading services.

School’s In–Do I Meet the Principle or Principal?

Principle or Principal

Is It Principle or Principal?

This is a tricky one! The words principle and principal are spelled so similarly that it can be difficult to remember which is which. I often find these two words mixed up when I’m proofreading. So, is it principle or principal? Keep reading and I’ll give you some tips on how to figure that out!

Principle:

The word principle is defined as: rule of action or conduct; a fundamental doctrine or tenet. It is often use in connection with moral, or between right and wrong.

The teacher’s principles reminded the kids to treat each other kindly.

Or: 

One principle of the company is to have a good work ethic.

Think of it as a rule or a code of conduct.

 

Principal:

The word principal is defined as: chief or head, particularly of a school. It could also be used as an adjective meaning first or highest in rank, importance, or value. One example would be:

Bummer. I got sent to the principal’s office.

Or:

The principal ingredient in the cookies is chocolate chips.

The easiest way to remember this is to look at the end of the word–pal. The principal is your “pal!”

 

Pop Quiz:

Ok, let’s try a few and see if you can figure out the correct word to use.

  1. Where is  the __________ car parked?
  2. My school’s __________ is so friendly!
  3. What are the company’s __________ ? 
  4. Is the __________ in her offic?
  5. What is the __________ ingredient in her famous recipe?
  6. What are the __________ of the team?
  7. Why is that  __________ important to learn?
  8. You’re right, the __________ is so funny! He makes me laugh.
  9. Which __________ should we implement at today’s conference?
  10. The __________ discussed the school’s __________ with her students. “These __________ will help you in your everyday life,” said the  __________.

Okay, how’d you do?

  1. principal’s
  2. principal
  3. principles
  4. principal
  5. principal
  6. principles
  7. principle
  8. principal
  9. principle
  10. principal, principles, principles, principal

Whew! You made it! Congratulations! You are now an expert at figuring out if it should be principle or principal!

Do you need something to help you remember? Click HERE for your free download of the above graphic.

Do you need a proofreader? Click HERE for more information on my proofreading services.

 

Similar Tips You May Be Interested In:

Everyday vs Every day   There, Their, and They're

*Thanks to Dictionary.com for the info. 

Help! Is it Everyday or Every day?

Everyday vs Every day

Everyday vs Every day

This morning on Instagram I saw a post highlighting a sign that used everyday incorrectly. Aw yes, the confusion continues–everyday vs every day. I know it can be confusing! They look and sound similar, but don’t let them fool you! They are used in different ways. 

Everyday:

The word everyday is defined as: encountered or used routinely or typically: ordinary. It is an adjective, and it answers the question “what kind?” One example would be:

This morning I followed my everyday routine.

Or: 

My everyday chores include sweeping the floor and making dinner.

Remember that everyday is an adjective, so it will be describing something.

everyday clothes; everyday schedule; everyday route; everyday meals; everyday monotony. 

Every day:

The phrase every day is defined as: when something happens each day. It’s an adverbial phrase and answers the question “when?” Just try replacing it with each day; if it fits then you’re using it correctly. One example would be:

Every day I go for a run.

Or:

Every day during the summer my kids read for 30 minutes.

Remember that every day can be replaced by each day.

Every day the sunset is different; Every day I like to write in my journal; Every day my kids want to go swimming.

Ok, let’s try a few and see if you can figure out the correct word to use.

  1. My __________ run makes me feel so strong.
  2. __________ I try to eat healthy.
  3. What is your __________ routine?
  4. What do your kids need to do __________ ?
  5. It helps to make a habit of your __________ reading.
  6. __________ my husband goes to work.
  7. We swam in the lake __________ of our vacation.
  8. You need to brush your teeth __________ !
  9. Why is my neighbor’s dog’s barking an __________ thing?
  10. __________ I ask my kids to do their __________ chores. Why do I need to ask __________? They should know it’s an __________ thing.

 

Okay, how’d you do?

  1. everyday
  2. Every day
  3. everday
  4. every day
  5. everyday
  6. Every day
  7. every day
  8. every day
  9. everyday
  10. Every day, everyday, every day, everyday

Whew! You made it! Congratulations! You are now an everyday vs every day expert!

Do you need something to help you remember? Click HERE for your free download of the above graphic.

Do you need a proofreader? Click HERE for more information on my proofreading services.

Thank you to Dictionary.com for much of my information!

There, Their, and They’re

There, Their, and They're

Help! What’s the Difference Between There, Their, and They’re?

When proofreading, three of the most commonly misused words I see are there, their, and they’re. I know it’s confusing! They look similar and sound similar, but they are used for very different things. Don’t let them fool you! Keep reading to learn how to correctly use the words there, their, and they’re.

There:

The word there is defined as: in or at that place. Think of it as a place. One example would be:

The ball is over there.

Or:

Why are you way over there?

This is how I tell my kids to remember it: The word here is inside the word there. Like this

Here or there?

Their:

The word their is defined as: of or relating to them or themselves especially as possessors. Think of it as possessive people. One example would be:

It’s their day to mow the lawn.

Or:

That is their house.

They’re:

They’re is the contraction of the words they are. The only time you get to use it is if you use it in place of they are. For example:

They’re headed up to the mountains today. (They are headed up to the mountains today.)

Or:

They’re my friends. (They are my friends.)

Ok, let’s try a few and see if you can figure out the correct word to use.

  1. Where is __________ car parked?
  2. __________ so friendly!
  3. What is that way over __________?
  4. Is that __________ school?
  5. I saw you when you were standing over __________.
  6. Where are they from? __________ from California.
  7. Why is that truck parked right __________?
  8. You’re right, __________ so funny!
  9. Why do you want __________ phone number?
  10. __________ in that building over __________ because __________ dad works __________.

Okay, how’d you do?

  1. their
  2. They’re
  3. there
  4. their
  5. there
  6. They’re
  7. there
  8. they’re
  9. their
  10. They’re, there, their, there

Whew! You made it! Congratulations! You are now a there, their, and they’re expert!

Do you need something to help you remember? Click HERE for your free download of the above graphic.

Do you need a proofreader? Click HERE for more information on my proofreading services.